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Baker Street Advertising
September 25, 2017
Brian Bacino

NorCal Honda Takes on Millennials

By:

#Millennials #and #Adulting

While developing work for Honda’s latest campaign, targeted toward younger car buyers, we discovered The Holy Grail of Millennial Marketing Secrets:

Millennials are young humans!!!

There it is. We shared our billion bitcoin secret.

We also created a campaign that taps into a powerful life stage our 20-something target is experiencing: “Adulting” — that moment when you find yourself, for the first time, doing very grownup things. And to break through the skepticism, millennials have toward slickly-prepared advertising, we enlisted Bent Image Lab to create a look that seems to be homemade and organic, yet jumps from the small mobile screen with cutting edge technology. By the way, Millennials would hate that last sentence.

Web Videos

“Civic Reasons” :30

“Speed vs Space” :30

“Iceberg” :30

Baker Street Advertising Credits:
Chief Creative Officer: Brian Bacino
President: Jack Boland
Chief Strategy Officer: Don Donovan
Copywriters: Brian Bacino/Robert Leon/Sarah Inglis/Bob Dorfman/Lesly Pyle
Art Directors: Sarah Inglis/Ken Woodard
Producers: Julie Costanzo/Brody McHugh/Lauren Finerman
Senior Strategist: Howie Leibach
Group Account Director: Dan Nilsen
Account Supervisor: Christine Rodriguez
Senior Account Executive: Megan Boland

Production Credits:
Directors: Soloman Burbridge, Joshua Cox and Rob Shaw, Bent Image Lab
Partner/Executive Producer: Ray DiCarlo, Bent Image Lab
Executive Producer: Anthony Greene, Bent Image Lab
Producers: Brianna Vitale/Gabi Villasenor, Bent Image Lab
Sound Engineer: Lance Limbocker, Limbocker Studios

Brian Bacino, Creative Chief B2, Data Analytics, Digital Marketing, Honda, Uncategorized

September 12, 2017
Bob Dorfman

Would you buy a Coke from this Man?

By:

As of this writing, the 2017 NFL season is well underway — and Colin Kaepernick is still unemployed. Clearly superior on the field to many of the 64+ NFL QBs currently earning paychecks, the anthem-kneeler is apparently too controversial for the league’s top brass — though they don’t seem to have the same problem with domestic abusers, sexual assaulters, drunk drivers, drug cheaters or air pressure manipulators.

Kaepernick — this close to winning a Super Bowl ring, and only recently one of the game’s most marketable stars, selling for Nike, Beats by Dre and Jaguar, among others — is now too polarizing to even pitch a spiral. A marketer today would have to be crazy to sign him to an endorsement deal, right?

Well, maybe not.

True, if you’re Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Visa or most any other major, well-established brand, you risk alienating a significant percentage of your customer base by aligning with a controversial athlete like Kaepernick. And given the current political state of our country, it appears this controversy isn’t going away anytime soon.

But what if you’re a brand new fashion or cosmetics company, looking to make a splash with a Time Magazine cover boy whose physique’s been featured in an ESPN Magazine Body Issue. Or you’re an up-and-coming sports performance brand who could use the hard-working athlete in a dramatic “If the call comes, I’ll be ready” training campaign. Or you’re Ikea and might consider running an ad for your full line of seating products, headlined “Why kneel when you can sit?” (Okay, maybe a “no” on this one.)

Of course, the best way for a controversial jock to get back into the public’s — and Madison Avenue’s — good graces, is to play well and win, win, win. You know how we love our winners in America.

Maybe a company like Rakuten has the right idea. They’re paying the  extremely winning Golden State Warriors a whopping $20M a year to display their logo on a 2.5-inch patch on the NBA Champs’ game jerseys. Funny, that’s about the same yearly sum that Nike will reportedly pay RusselI Westbrook for the next 10 years to promote their Jordan Brand.

Are these deals worth it? For Nike, it’s a long-term partnership with a highly visible personality who’s not only a superstar on the court, but a fashion icon off — coolly representing a product line named after a legend who most call the best ever, but one that today’s teen demographic probably never saw play live.

As for Rakuten, the Japanese tech holding company is hardly a household name in the US, and will surely benefit by associating with arguably the world’s hottest sports franchise right now. And because it’s a team deal, not an individual player sponsorship, Rakuten doesn’t have to worry about a misbehaving or overly-political jock blowing their investment.

But total Warriors domination could get old real quick for non-Bay-Area fans. Rakuten could be investing in a team that a growing number of people consider an evil empire.

And even if Westbrook should win the next five consecutive NBA titles and MVPs, what if he, heaven forbid, starts kneeling for anthems?

Dorfman on Sports, Sports, Sports Marketing, Sports Marketing, Uncategorized

September 5, 2017
Sarah Inglis

Mariani’s Probiotic Prunes Deliver a 1-2 Punch to Pills and Yogurt

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Despite “probiotics” being a buzzword, there’s been a lot of confusion in the category. So when Mariani asked BSA to help launch the world’s first Probiotic Prunes, we strove for transparency.

We challenged consumer notions of probiotics by directly addressing our two biggest competitors — yogurt & pills. Creating several online videos, we demonstrated why Mariani’s Probiotic Prunes offered a better route to good digestive & immune health — one that didn’t include yogurt’s high sugar content or add to consumer pill fatigue. And to pique viewers’ curiosity, we leveraged a few bizarre visuals and injected some humor into the messaging.

Here’s our launch spot:

And two shorter spots that narrowed in on our major probiotic competition. In this version, Mariani warns against a Pillpocalypse:

And here, Mariani takes a swing at probiotic yogurt:

The videos led to a landing page with more in-depth explanations of the product benefits:

Baker Street Advertising Credits:
Chief Creative Officer: Brian Bacino
President: Jack Boland
Chief Strategy Officer: Don Donovan
Copywriter: Robert Leon
Art Director: Sarah Inglis
Producer: Brody McHugh
Senior Strategist: Howie Leibach
Senior Account Executive: Juliana King

Production Credits:
Director of Photography: Cliff Traiman, Little Giant Lighting & Grip
Editor/Animator: Darren Orr, Beast
Sound Engineer: Andy Greenberg, One Union Recording Studios

Digital Marketing, Uncategorized