The 2014 World Series went six compelling games, the ratings were solid, the beards full, and the performances—and umps’ calls—memorable.

But what does it all mean for the endorsement fortunes of the Red Sox and Cardinals’ players? Do any of them have the clout to lead major campaigns, or the power to compel consumers to buy? Is baseball too regional a sport for advertisers seeking athlete pitchmen with national appeal? And with so many jocks embroiled in scandal, and a social media landscape that amplifies every indiscretion into major news, are marketers willing to risk big bucks to tie their products to these guys?

Here’s how this sports marketing expert rates the product-pitching talent:



David Ortiz.  The Series MVP now has three rings, a new 2014 Chevy Silverado, and a Hall of Fame resume. One of the game’s most recognizable and well-liked players, Big Papi is perhaps the only one from this Big Show who could carry a national campaign.

His current endorsement income is in the neighborhood of $3-4M a year, and could see a $1M yearly bump following his remarkable Series performance at the plate. Not even an alleged positive test for PED’s revealed in 2009 has done much to damage his appeal. Look for him to show up on talk shows, cereal boxes, milk mustache ads, maybe even a trip to Disney World in the near future. Lethal to opposing pitchers, yet lovable to fans, Big Papi’s got the power to pitch power tools, muscle cars and trucks, or given his girth, any fast food. A good choice to reach the booming Hispanic market, too. And his “This is our f’ing city” quote could be the tagline for any local Boston ad campaign. The way he hit in this Series, Fox ought to add him to all future promos for their new show “Almost Human.”