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Baker Street Advertising
December 11, 2017
BSA

OUR HOLIDAY WISH FOR YOU

By:

WHATEVER YOU CHASE

THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

WE HOPE YOU CHILL

WITH HOLIDAY CHEER

Baker Street Advertising has made a donation to Bloom Marin and The Hanna Boys Center, honoring our good friends and partners in 2017.

Shot on i-Phone at Stinson Beach.

Special thanks to Eric Stafford, Rough House Editorial and POZ the Cockapoo.

Baker Streeters

December 5, 2017
Brian Bacino

WOW WE WON – W3 WEB AWARDS

By:

Baker Street just won a Gold and Silver in the prestigious 2017 W3 Awards, recognizing the power of web creativity. We won Gold for our SF Giants interactive story, “Orange Fridays,” part of our 4-part digital film series for the Giants. And we won Silver for our very own website, BakerStAdvertising.com.

“Orange Fridays” Interactive Film

Our Giants Client challenged us to create innovative content for their social channels and we delivered the triple W win with this interactive campaign that showed Giants fans they can experience many different flavors of Giants games depending on the day of the week.

“We Are Sundays” Interactive Film

“Two for Tuesdays” Interactive Film

“Day Baseball” Interactive Film

Credits: SF Giants
Larry Baer, President/CEO
Staci Slaughter, EVP, Communications and Senior Advisor to the CEO
Mario Alioto, EVP, Business Operations
Danny Dann, VP, Marketing & Advertising
Paul Hodges, VP, SFG Productions
Bryan Srabian, VP, Brand Development and Digital Media
Becky Biniek, Digital Media Manager
Kara Gilmore, Marketing and Advertising Project Manager

Giants Video Credits: Baker Street Advertising
President: Jack Boland
Chief Creative Officer/Copywriter: Brian Bacino
Chief Strategy Officer: Don Donovan
Copywriter: Robert Leon
Art Directors: Ken Woodard/Jason Wong
Interactive/Cinemagraph Art Director: Xavier Li
Producer: Brody McHugh
Creative Manager/Script Supervisor: Lesly Pyle
Senior Strategist: Howie Leibach
Account Supervisor: Nick Spillner
Senior Account Executive: Juliana King

SF Giants Video Production Credits
Director: Brian Bacino, Baker Street Advertising
Executive Producer: Mark Dwyer, Dwyer Productions
Director of Photography: Cliff Traiman, Little Giant Lighting & Grip
Line Producer: Jon Bowden
Editor: Alan Chimenti, Ntropic Editorial
ECD/Founder: Nate Robinson, Ntropic Editorial
Post Producer: Emily Avoujageli & Danielle Cheifetz, Ntropic Editorial
VFX Director: Aaron Vasquez, Ntropic Editorial
VFX Artists: Ethan Chang & Miguel Diaz-Rivera, Ntropic Editorial
Colorists: Chris Martin, Nick Sanders, & Kristy Navarro, Ntropic Editorial
Graphics Artist: Erica Poat, Ntropic Editorial
Flame Artist: Mark Everson & Todd Hemsley, Ntropic Editorial
Junior Flame Artist: Jerome Knight, Ntropic Editorial
Rotoscoping Producer: John Mendaros​, Ntropic Editorial
Rotoscoping Artists: Roel Elaco, Jun dela Pena, Alfred Ilagen, Ntropic Editorial
Post Assistants: Gillen Burch & Yvonne Pon​, Ntropic Editorial
Audio Mixer: Andy Greenberg, One Union Recording

*****

BakerStAdvertising.com snares Silver.

One of our biggest accomplishments of 2017 was the optimization of our new Baker Street website. A labor of love spearheaded expertly by our Writer/Creative Manager/Super Star, Lesly Pyle and our Design Director, Ken Woodard, our site stylishly displays our process, our work and our people, and we are very proud of them all.

BSA Website Credits:
President: Jack Boland
Chief Creative Officer/Copywriter: Brian Bacino
Chief Strategy Officer: Don Donovan
Art Directors: Ken Woodard/Brian Powers/Lesly Pyle
Copywriter/Digital Producer/Site Admin: Lesly Pyle
In-House Video Editors: Harrison Chapman, Jane Goodwin-Bell
Video Editors: Michael Pickman-Thoon, Eric Stafford, Rough House Editorial
Senior Strategist: Howie Leibach
Web Developer/UX UI Design: Scott Johnson/Jen Marek/Eric Lindsey, ThunderBeast

Brian Bacino, Creative Chief B2, Digital Marketing, SF Giants, Sports, Sports Marketing

October 25, 2017
Brian Bacino

NorCal Honda Takes on Millennials

By:

#Millennials #and #Adulting

While developing work for Honda’s latest campaign, targeted toward younger car buyers, we discovered The Holy Grail of Millennial Marketing Secrets:

Millennials are young humans!!!

There it is. We shared our billion bitcoin secret.

We also created a campaign that taps into a powerful life stage our 20-something target is experiencing: “Adulting” — that moment when you find yourself, for the first time, doing very grownup things. And to break through the skepticism, millennials have toward slickly-prepared advertising, we enlisted Bent Image Lab to create a look that seems to be homemade and organic, yet jumps from the small mobile screen with cutting edge technology. By the way, Millennials would hate that last sentence.

Web Videos

“Civic Reasons” :30

“Speed vs Space” :30

“Iceberg” :30

“Run The World” :30

Baker Street Advertising Credits:
President: Jack Boland
Chief Creative Officer: Brian Bacino
Chief Strategy Officer: Don Donovan
Copywriters: Brian Bacino/Robert Leon/Sarah Inglis/Bob Dorfman/Lesly Pyle
Art Directors: Sarah Inglis/Ken Woodard
Producers: Julie Costanzo/Brody McHugh/Lauren Finerman
Senior Strategist: Howie Leibach
Group Account Director: Dan Nilsen
Account Supervisor: Christine Rodriguez
Senior Account Executive: Megan Boland

Production Credits:
Directors: Soloman Burbridge, Joshua Cox and Rob Shaw, Bent Image Lab
Partner/Executive Producer: Ray DiCarlo, Bent Image Lab
Executive Producer: Anthony Greene, Bent Image Lab
Producers: Brianna Vitale/Gabi Villasenor, Bent Image Lab
Sound Engineer: Lance Limbocker, Limbocker Studios

Brian Bacino, Creative Chief B2, Data Analytics, Digital Marketing, Honda

October 15, 2017
Brian Bacino

Hanna Boys Center. Truly making a difference.

By:

We were blessed with the opportunity to help the Hanna Boys Center of Sonoma spread their proven approach to helping at-risk teens. Everyone who touched this project echoed the same sentiment: man, it’s nice to work on something that is truly making a difference. Thanks to all involved.

Our web video for the Hanna Boys Center tells the true story of a Hanna student who overcame enormous obstacles to become a successful, productive adult, thanks to the Hanna Boys Center.

Our film shows how Hanna’s unique approach to caring for troubled kids really works. Hanna doesn’t ask, “what’s wrong with this kid?” They ask, “what happened to this kid?” And how the committed staff handles the kids from that pivotal philosophical belief is why the Hanna Way is worth spreading. We hope our film helps to do just that.

Cinematographer, Cliff Traiman, generously provided his clever camera work to create a seamless journey, falling at first into a future of despair, but thanks to Hanna, changes direction and soars toward hope. Special thanks to Beast editorial who refused payment for their brilliant post. That’s giving back, man.

Client Credits:
Brian Farragher, M.B.A., Chief Executive Officer
Chris Jones, Chief Development Officer
Christy Kenyon, Director of Marketing & Communications

Baker Street Advertising Credits:
President: Jack Boland
Chief Creative Officer: Brian Bacino
Chief Strategy Officer: Don Donovan
Art Director: Sarah Inglis
Copywriter: Sara Alterman
Producer: Brody McHugh
Creative Manager/Script Supervisor: Lesly Pyle
Senior Strategist: Howie Leibach
Account Supervisor: Nick Spillner
Senior Account Executive: Juliana King

Production Credits:
Directors: Harrison Chapman/Sarah Inglis, Baker Street Advertising
Director of Photography: Cliff Traiman, Little Giant Lighting & Grip
Editor: Doug Walker, Beast Editorial
Founder: Jon Ettinger, Beast Editorial
Producer: Vickie Sornsilp, Beast Editorial
Gaffer: Vincent Wrenn
Key Grip: Damian Lucas
1st AC: Deidre Locklear
Sound: Rod Hartzog

Brian Bacino, Creative Chief B2

September 12, 2017
Bob Dorfman

Would you buy a Coke from this Man?

By:

As of this writing, the 2017 NFL season is well underway — and Colin Kaepernick is still unemployed. Clearly superior on the field to many of the 64+ NFL QBs currently earning paychecks, the anthem-kneeler is apparently too controversial for the league’s top brass — though they don’t seem to have the same problem with domestic abusers, sexual assaulters, drunk drivers, drug cheaters or air pressure manipulators.

Kaepernick — this close to winning a Super Bowl ring, and only recently one of the game’s most marketable stars, selling for Nike, Beats by Dre and Jaguar, among others — is now too polarizing to even pitch a spiral. A marketer today would have to be crazy to sign him to an endorsement deal, right?

Well, maybe not.

True, if you’re Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Visa or most any other major, well-established brand, you risk alienating a significant percentage of your customer base by aligning with a controversial athlete like Kaepernick. And given the current political state of our country, it appears this controversy isn’t going away anytime soon.

But what if you’re a brand new fashion or cosmetics company, looking to make a splash with a Time Magazine cover boy whose physique’s been featured in an ESPN Magazine Body Issue. Or you’re an up-and-coming sports performance brand who could use the hard-working athlete in a dramatic “If the call comes, I’ll be ready” training campaign. Or you’re Ikea and might consider running an ad for your full line of seating products, headlined “Why kneel when you can sit?” (Okay, maybe a “no” on this one.)

Of course, the best way for a controversial jock to get back into the public’s — and Madison Avenue’s — good graces, is to play well and win, win, win. You know how we love our winners in America.

Maybe a company like Rakuten has the right idea. They’re paying the  extremely winning Golden State Warriors a whopping $20M a year to display their logo on a 2.5-inch patch on the NBA Champs’ game jerseys. Funny, that’s about the same yearly sum that Nike will reportedly pay RusselI Westbrook for the next 10 years to promote their Jordan Brand.

Are these deals worth it? For Nike, it’s a long-term partnership with a highly visible personality who’s not only a superstar on the court, but a fashion icon off — coolly representing a product line named after a legend who most call the best ever, but one that today’s teen demographic probably never saw play live.

As for Rakuten, the Japanese tech holding company is hardly a household name in the US, and will surely benefit by associating with arguably the world’s hottest sports franchise right now. And because it’s a team deal, not an individual player sponsorship, Rakuten doesn’t have to worry about a misbehaving or overly-political jock blowing their investment.

But total Warriors domination could get old real quick for non-Bay-Area fans. Rakuten could be investing in a team that a growing number of people consider an evil empire.

And even if Westbrook should win the next five consecutive NBA titles and MVPs, what if he, heaven forbid, starts kneeling for anthems?

Dorfman on Sports, Sports, Sports Marketing, Sports Marketing

August 19, 2017
Howie Leibach

Are Millennials About To Kill Ads Too?

By:

According to new research from The McCarthy Group over 84% of Millennials no longer respond to traditional forms of advertising, nor do they trust it.

And Only 1% of Millennials say a compelling ad would make them trust a brand more.

It sounds pretty dire; but does the ad industry actually believe this?

BSA has noticed a shift in ad strategy to “address” the polarizing belief that Millennials — the same awful generation who killed cable TV, the beer industry, hotels, and even Applebees — will soon want to kill ads too.

Curious how some agencies are beginning to please these Millennial “media-killing” machines?

Here are 3 big trends I’m seeing right now:

1. The product takes a back seat to content.

So Millennials don’t like ads? Let’s just hide the product behind good content!

Recently Chase created a Battle of the Paddle video to promote Chase QuickPay. Rather than hard-sell their payment product anywhere upfront, Chase was more concerned about great content. They got high profile names to play in a competitive game of ping-pong, and only after breaking lots of furniture at the very end do Steph Curry and Serena Williams subtly use product at the end.

Here, Chase realizes that people are coming to watch the stars. They aren’t necessarily interested in shoving the product down people’s throats. Chase’s value proposition is compelling content, not the product — which is downplayed, but promoted towards the end.

This soft-sell strategy relies heavily on attracting organic eyeballs first, with the hope that Chase’s product trickles down to interest just some of the majority of people — most of whom only came for Steph and Serena content.

2. Destroy the ad.

So Millennials want to skip ads? Let’s just blow it up before they can!

This strategy is being utilized by a few gutsy agencies with a defeatist (or perhaps honest) mindset: if you can’t beat them; join them!

Geico grabs your attention by bragging “You can’t skip this ad because it’s already over!” They know you don’t want an ad to begin with. So just skip it … courtesy of them!

Geico, and other top brands like Honda are filming ads with a new POV: the whole concept of an ad is perhaps too aggressive and silly — and they’re willing to play along.

This rather transparent approach says “hey, we know that you know that all we really want is your attention so let’s just be honest about what’s happening here, make you laugh, and maybe you’ll like us a little more long term.”

Sometimes humility goes a long way and you might take interest in the brand. And sometimes they just entertain you for 6 seconds and you move on with your life.

It could go either way.

3. We’re in on the joke!

Millennials are over ads? Let’s just disguise them as something else altogether!

Netflix was caught trolling themselves in order to promote a new comedy lineup.

To promote their new big comedy lineup Netflix disguised billboards throughout LA as rude Netflix insults. Jerry Seinfeld, Dave Chapelle, Chris Rock, Amy Schumer and Adam Sandler all have multi-million dollar deals on Netflix.

By making themselves the butt of a joke, Netflix got lots of blank stares, but also got lots of people talking — and created a PR firestorm in the process.

Like most of their disruptive content, Netflix got by on word-of-mouth for years. So this approach feeds into their DNA — let’s get people talking first — and worry about the construct second.

So is it finally time to flip your Millennial campaigns up-side-down?

In short…no.

At BSA, we believe you should embrace your product benefits; not hide from them. Yes, you need creativity as all the digital concepts above definitely have, but don’t underestimate the most basic and essential ingredient for success: purchase intent!

In BSA’s most recent NorCal Honda Millennial campaign, we are flashy, fun and hopefully trendy. But we also play up the notion that Millennials are ambitious and want to make things happen. The Honda car models tap into their psyche, offering aspirational benefits — Rule The World, Climb The Ladder, Be the Man/Woman You Want To Be!…It all comes together in a Honda….But first we remind them that it can only happen by getting into the dealership.

Ad Trends

These experimental ad formats are a response to Millennials becoming hyper-stimulated, super-low-attention-span-clicking digital natives who get inundated with 1000s of ads each day.

It leads to a risky agency POV of “whatever we put out there for picky Millennials must now be game-changing content they’ve never seen before!”

But Millennials don’t actually want hyper-stimulating, outside-the-box content. They just need content to be relevant, intriguing and useful.

Yes, Millennials skip ads if they’re bored (59% of them skip) but 29% of them actually watch online ads to full completion.

So of the 80 million Millennials out there, at least 23 million will hear you out at any given moment.

Just make sure you have something to say.

Sources:
Huffington Post
Google Images
Adage
Business Insider
MillennialBranding.com
ClickZ.com
http://www.businessinsider.com/millennials-skip-youtube-ads-and-thats-ok-2017-1
http://millennialbranding.com/2015/millennial-consumer-study/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthew-tyson/millennials-want-brands-t_b_9032718.html
https://www.clickz.com/84-percent-of-millennials-dont-trust-traditional-advertising/27030/
http://variety.com/2016/digital/news/millennial-gen-z-youtube-netflix-video-social-tv-study-1201740829/

Analytics, Data Analytics, Digital Marketing, Honda, Qualitative Research, Quantitative Research