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Baker Street Advertising
December 20, 2016
Brian Bacino

2016 Year In Review

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2016. Well, that didn’t turn out exactly the way we expected.

Lots of surprises.

Some of them, not so good.

Like not having our beloved SF Giants fulfill their even year prophecy.

But we still had a ton of fun making the work and helped the Giants continue their record-breaking attendance streak. (Click image below to see the 2016 Giants Campaign page.)

And speaking of records, NorCal Honda continued its sizzling pace thanks to a calendar chockfull of sales events, testimonial films and a robust digital and social media effort.

The first series of key frames below is from our “Go Small. Get Big.” campaign. (Click image below to visit the campaign page.) And the second set is from our seasonal sales events.

Plus, we introduced a new social campaign for Acura called “More of a Good Thing,” featuring 3 inspiring stories from NorCal Acura drivers who are making their world a better place.

The Lin’s Story :30

To see the Lin’s full story, click here.

Marshal’s Story :30

To see Marshal’s full story, click here.

The Young’s Story :30

To see the Young’s full story, click here.

So, while 2016 had its fair share of challenges, Baker Street had its fair share of fun making work for our clients and watching their businesses grow. Check it out in our video below, “Baker Streeters Love the Work”:

And, oh yeah, we launched our website. You know, the one you’re on.

Brian Bacino, Creative Chief B2, Honda, SF Giants, Sports, Sports Marketing, Uncategorized

November 1, 2016
Brian Kelleher

Programmatic Collaboration, What?!?

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Big-brand agencies have complained that there is a lack of Cannes-worthy creativity in programmatic and little integration among the creative, media and data operations that go into a modern ad campaign. This is typically due to the agencies separating their departments into specific silos with little collaboration. Holding companies like WPP are missing many opportunities due to a lack of communication between their creative and media agencies.*

Audience Data Visualization

“We sit on top of the data, see all the signals and know how they are being used, but we don’t have direct access to content creators, so we often need to script up the piece of content we need in order to accomplish the goal that the advertiser wants. It would be amazing if the two can go together in a meaningful way. We are constantly reaching out to WPP agency leads directly or through GroupM. But the [collaboration] hasn’t happened significantly yet.” – Tim Bagwell, VP of Xaaxis Labs, a division of GroupM.

Programmatic creative is enriched with some form of data, either retargeting or audience data, and is served with the intent of advertising something the audience have recently shown interest in while web browsing. For example, a user goes onto Zappos, looks up a pair of Nikes and then leaves the site. That person is then retargeted with those same Nike shoes shown in the unit, or possibly similar shoes they may have missed. This tactic can go deeper to the point that when our media is looking to serve an impression on a given site, if the data for this person also shows this person lives in a windy area, we can serve that person a unit for a Nike windbreaker. You can also use these tools to set up automatic tests to optimize toward the best performing creative for that audience. Audiences are formed within a dynamic creative optimizer. The combinations of what we can learn of a person based on their browsing history, and how we can use this to serve them the most appropriate ads at the best time, are virtually limitless.

Dynamic Messaging

Baker Street Advertising, being a nimble, full-service agency has a great advantage here.  Our ability to make adjustments quickly will allow us to swim circles around the larger agencies where such a change will take much more time to implement.

BSA Image

Examples:

If person A is 3 months away from buying a car, we can serve a broad “see your NorCal Honda Dealers now!” message.

If person B is 2 months away from buying a car, and we know they are interested in midsize cars, we can serve them a carousel unit where they can scroll through various offers for Accords, Civics, or Insights.

If we know person C went to a dealership in the past month from their phone’s GPS, we can pair that with their browsing history to serve them a hard-hitting message, like “that Civic you were eyeing is now only $169/month!”

“A really simple observation I had when I moved from media to creative is that they’re two totally separate worlds. Media people are spending their days figuring out optimization and targeting, but it’s done completely separate of the actual idea.” — Adam Cahill, Anagram Founder, a programmatic agency.”**

Data Analysis

Part of the problem does stem from brands not being willing to share their data. While we do experience the issue of our clients being unwilling to share customer data (a very understandable stance considering privacy issues), our partners are able to gather enough information within their pixels that allow targeting to be highly focused. Pairing this targeting with templated creative management tools that will allow us to create dozens of variations of ads with different copy and backgrounds at the flip of a switch, allows us to break down which audiences are responding to each variation. Our teams need to continue to educate each other on what is available within our targeting capabilities, and why a certain message might resonate with a specific audience.

Of course, this route will bring up questions on the cost of producing so many variations for so many audience segments. How niche should we go with targeting and creative before we hit zero return? We need to test, retest, and continue testing audience segments with various creative. Start by finding a new, micro audience that is responding to a more generic message and adjust units to fit that audience. If media is able to generate a new micro audience that is showing promise, creative can then move to create and assign specific creative to that audience (i.e. targeting football moms with a Honda Odyssey unit with a tag line “Space for all your gear and the kids too.” – [sorry, not a copywriter]. This approach will also help us to avoid creative burnout.

BSA already demonstrates excellent collaboration, and as we work towards adopting new creative tools, such as Rich Media and Dynamic Creative, our teamwork, communication, and education across specialties will make our client’s campaigns that much more successful. Pairing data enabled targeting to custom content through dynamic creative is fast becoming the next big tactic, and we are on a great path to become leaders of this approach.

Brian Kelleher is an Associate Media Director at BSA, specializing in digital strategy, planning and buying.
 
* Digiday – “ The Programmatic Divide Still Persists” By: Yuyu Chen http://digiday.com/agencies/gap-programmatic-creative-media-planning-still-exists/

** Digiday – “Programmatic Creative Inches to a Fix” By: Shareen Pathak http://digiday.com/agencies/programmatic-creative-inches-toward-fix/

Analytics, Digital Marketing, Programmatic, Uncategorized

October 13, 2016
Brian Bacino

#BelievenHurts

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When you’’ve been #Believen since July, losing really hurts.

SFG16_BELIEVEN_Facebook_Rev1_828x315

Baker Street has been preparing for the post season since July, creating digital, outdoor, and TV for the SF Giants #Believen 2nd Half campaign. And while we are proud of the work, it has been tough to keep Believen when your team posts the worst 2nd half performance, ever.

Yet, through all the torture, our beloved Giants stayed together and kept fighting and somehow got in!

Crawford’s 7 Hits :15

MadBum’s Ks :15

And then they somehow came back!

NLDS 2016 Game 3 :30

So when that fatal 9th-inning meltdown came in Game 4 against the Cubs, it hit us hard.

We have been trying to reconcile this feeling of genuine loss over the Giants dramatic departure from their post season destiny. While it totally makes sense for players and coaches to feel devastated. Even members of the organization. But how can the dramatic and sudden end to the Giants post season have such a physical and emotional effect on us fans?

I guess the answer is we truly believe we are part of this. We have been soaking in champagne showers and championship parades, walking the world as kings. We feel like we know Hunter and his good friend, Buster. We love our homegrown heroes, Bumgarner, Crawford, Panik, Belt, … Conor! We have rode the emotional roller coaster year after year, but somehow, magically, we kept hoisting trophies!

Crawford Destiny :30

Big Game Hunter :30

Buster MVP :30

And so now, even in our even year, we suddenly feel the pain. An unfamiliar sting of it all, for the first time, not magically unfolding the way we hoped. It makes us finally realize those 3 Championships were not pre-ordained. They were’n’t guaranteed. They were miracles. They are more delicious than we realized the first 3 times. And our insatiable desire for another will only grow with this year’’s bitter end.

BSA_Team

Today it hurts. But then you realize how much fun, and how significant it is to feel like you are part of something like the SF Giants. That is the gift this team has given us fans. And while vitriol will likely spew over the next few days, in the end this organization makes us proud. Win or lose, Together We’’re Giant.

Under The Hat Tales: Kids :30

Brian Bacino, Creative Chief B2, SF Giants, Sports Marketing, Uncategorized

September 5, 2016
Howie Leibach

Can Data Predict “Correct” Advertising?

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In 2008, Nate Silver predicted Barack Obama as the next president of the United States way before the election took place. While the pundits relied on “gut-feelings,” Nate was skeptical. He rolled up his nerdy sleeves and crunched probabilities that leveraged historical data and micro trends within each municipality — something TV pundits simply weren’t doing.
 
Nate_Silver_2009
Pictured: Nate Silver, Statistician
 
In 2013, Netflix famously predicted “House of Cards” would be a huge hit, way before ever having the green light to produce it. Instead of guessing what show to fund first, Netflix looked at the completion rates of loyal users. Using Venn diagram data, they discovered that the melding of David Fincher’s “The Social Network”  and the British political thrillers was scoring off the charts. The analysis was so strong that they threw $100 million into season 1 — and the rest is history.
 
house-of-cards-kevin-spacey
 
Data is prophesizing BIG things like U.S. Elections and hit TV shows. So you might be wondering: Are we at the point where data can spit out the perfect ad?
 
The answer is, almost.
 
In 2016, IBM created promotional content based on machine learning. With little to no human assistance — the A.I. processed what it considered to be the best message for humans. While thought-provoking, there was a huge problem with it. The ad sucked.
 
This means one thing. Human creativity still matters immensely, and it will for decades. But data is growing stronger, and if used correctly can make a huge difference.
 
In 2016, the BEST creativity isn’t just head turning — it’s action-oriented; inspired by data to work harder. This means stronger segmenting, better ideas, and proof.
 
Baker Street takes this to heart.
 
Like Nate Silver, we embrace historical data for pin-point accuracy.
 
Like Netflix, we predict campaign success (with algorithms and velocity demand) before anyone writes a big check.
 
It’s a rare creative process that gets vetted from start to finish.
 
So while agencies are years away from churning out “the perfect ad,” Baker Street ensures that by coupling data with creativity, it’s more “correct” than ever before.  

Analytics, Data Analytics, Qualitative Research, Quantitative Research, Uncategorized

July 15, 2016
Brian Bacino

Honda “Go Small. Get Big.”

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It is often said that when it comes to creating advertising and marketing experiences, if you want it Good, Fast, and Cheap — you have to choose 2.
Well, we just destroyed that myth.

SMALL Post 3.Wed.6.8

In just 4 weeks Baker Street identified a key strategic insight, tested its potential lift and created a hard-hitting, visually-stunning campaign for our NorCal Honda Client, spending a fraction of what competitors pay for production. (Of course we nearly killed our producer, Brody McHugh, in the process but she seems to be coming around. So it’s all good.)

During our Discovery process, our Economic Behaviorists, identified a national trend showing many drivers opting for sub compact cars and smaller SUVs and trucks. To take advantage of this trend, and to show off Honda’s legendary line of small and sporty cars, especially the new HR-V, Baker Street quickly created this multi-channel campaign idea that had a field day with forced perspective photography and film. These eye-popping spots show when you Go Small you Get Big time performance, space, and pure fun.
 
HR-V Spot:

 
 Fit Spot:

 
 Civic Spot:

 
 HR-V + Fit Combo Spot:

 
Floor Stand and Banner:
Screen Shot 2016-06-22 at 5.38.20 PM

In-Store Poster:
Screen Shot 2016-06-21 at 1.43.51 PM

Social Posts:
Screen Shot 2016-06-21 at 1.50.12 PM

Screen Shot 2016-06-21 at 1.49.55 PM

Credits, Baker Street Advertising:
Chief Creative Officer: Brian Bacino
President: Jack Boland
Chief Strategy Officer: Don Donovan
Copywriter: Bob Dorfman
Art Director: Corey Stolberg
Producer: Brody McHugh
Senior Strategist: Howie Leibach
Creative Manager/Copywriter (Social): Lesly Pyle
In-House Editor/Cameraman: Harrison Chapman
Group Account Director: Dan Nilsen
Senior Account Executive: Megan Boland
Assistant Account Executive: Noah Zepponi

Credits, Production:
Director: Brian Bacino, Baker Street Advertising
Producer: Jed Mortenson, Waypoint Films
DP: Kevin Emmons
Post ECD: Nathan Robinson, Ntropic
Editor: Alan Chimenti, Ntropic
Colorist: Chris Martin, Ntropic
Assistant Editor: Gillen Burch, Ntropic
Lead Flame Artist: Matt Tremaglio, Ntropic
Flame Artist: Nathan Walker, Ntropic
Senior Designer: Tali Oliver, Ntropic
Design Assistant: Erica Post, Ntropic
Assistant: Yvonne Pon, Ntropic
Senior Producer/Head of Production: Emily Avoujageli, Ntropic
Audio Mixer: Andy Greenberg, One Union

Brian Bacino, Honda, Uncategorized

June 2, 2016
Bob Dorfman

Who You Like In The NBA Finals: Nike or Under Armour?

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Screen Shot 2016-06-02 at 1.03.45 PM
 
The 2016 NBA Finals pits the Golden State Warriors against the Cleveland Cavaliers in a much-anticipated rematch of last year’s Finals, won by the Warriors. But there’s another big-time battle happening in this series. The shoe-off between Nike and Under Armour. Athletic apparel giant Nike recently signed Cleveland’s king, LeBron James, to a lifetime endorsement deal. But up-and-comer Under Armour has on their team the Warriors’ Stephen Curry, the NBA’s MVP the last two years, and the game’s most thrilling player since Michael Jordan. Who’s going to win the merchandise match-up?

I recently offered up my opinion in a story for CBS News:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/this-years-nba-finals-pit-nike-against-under-armour/

Dorfman on Sports, Sports, Sports Marketing, Uncategorized